The New Humanism

Navigation

A Place at the Table

James Croft

An appeal in song and prose.

Print This Article

by James Croft

"Everyone should be heard, and no one left out of the cultural discussion

Editor's Note: The following is adapted from a talk given at the Congress on the Future of Faith at Harvard.

I'm James, and I'm a choirboy. You can probably tell—something about my angelic features, and the slight haze of a halo above my head. And as a kid I loved singing in Sunday Service. I loved the sense of ritual, the quiet aura of the space, but most of all I loved the singing:

[Sung]

Of the Father's love begotten, ere the worlds began to be,
He is Alpha and Omega, He the source, the ending He,
Of the things that are, that have been,
And that future years shall see, evermore and evermore!

I remember once going up to the altar to be blessed—something I didn't usually do. I could see the Reverend moving down the line of children with their heads bowed, placing his hand upon their heads, the smell of incense in the air. And when he got to me, the Reverend pressed really hard, as if he was trying to squeeze God into me. And I wondered: perhaps he knows I don't believe.

You see, I'm an Atheist. I grew up in a happy nonreligious family. My values come from the rational, pluralistic vision of Star Trek (in fact I'm convinced I'm named not after the King James Bible but after James T Kirk). I used to watch the stars with my grandfather, visit the planetarium with him, listen to Carl Sagan, and contemplate the wonder of the universe—no God included.

So it's a little strange that I should be here, speaking with you today. I am a representative of the faithless at a gathering of the faithful. What am I doing here? This is a question that another of our attendees, Chris Stedman, an atheist and a leader in the Interfaith movement, regularly encounters.

I'm here because, in the UK, my atheism was never a problem. I debated spiritedly with people of all religious faiths, and found my position, generally, respected. I had a place at the table. Then, I came to the USA. And here, in my first few weeks at Harvard, I met a fellow graduate student in the canteen of my dorm.

"You don't believe in God? Are you serious?" He laughed uproariously, flinging his hands into the air before slapping them down onto the table which sat between us, causing the glasses on our canteen trays to ring, our cutlery to jump. "So, what? You think that all this"—he gestured expansively, encompassing all of everything with his arms—"just sprang up out of nothing, with no reason behind it?" I wish now that I had given a more eloquent response than a surprised "Yes!", my eyebrows raised in astonishment.

I remember my fellow Harvard graduate student prodding at my beliefs as if I was some strange, exotic curio, asking "If you don't believe in God, where do your morals come from?", and "Isn't your life meaningless without an Ultimate Purpose" (the capitals were clearly indicated by the portentous way in which the words "ultimate" and "purpose" were intoned). If I were someone inclined to take offense, it strikes me that these could be seen as extremely offensive questions, implying as they do that the only route to a moral life is through religion, and that my nonreligious worldview must therefore be ethically deficient and devoid of meaning.

After four years living in the States, however, I am no longer surprised when I hear such sentiments expressed. Instead, horrifyingly, I am sometimes relieved if the worst someone has to say to me about my worldview is that it must lead to an amoral and meaningless existence. Why? Because, since then, I have come face to face with many more egregious and insidious examples of prejudice against Humanists, agnostics, and the nonreligious.

I have heard televangelists shriek that people who are not traditionally religious are responsible for social breakdown, crime, and natural disasters. I have heard news reporters casually describe nonreligious people as de-facto supporters of Stalinism and Nazism. I have noted how it seems impossible for a nonbeliever to be elected to high office in this country, and how public declarations of religious faith are required by those aiming highest.

The effect of all this hit me when I met Bill on a Secular Service trip to New Orleans. Bill attends Humanist meetings but refuses to pose for group photographs because he fears, should his atheism be revealed, that he would lose his job.

And seeing all this made me want to work harder for Humanism, brought me to Greg and the Humanist Chaplaincy at Harvard, and called me to apply to become a Humanist Chaplain myself. And my relationship with the Humanist Chaplaincy has been profound: it was on the same service trip where I met Bill that I was able to resolve my struggles around my sexuality and come out as a gay man. So I have much to thank the Humanist community for, this group of atheists who helped me find myself.

Now, not all of us are atheists—in fact I imagine there are very few here! But all of us, even though we're committed to different issues and different values, want our story to be heard. We don't want to be dismissed. We don't want anyone to tell us, just because of the values we espouse, or our faith. that we aren't worth listening to.

That commitment—that everyone should be heard, and no one left out of the cultural discussion—is part of the founding principles of this country which, for now at least, we all call home. In America, we're all part of a remarkable experiment—a country in which people can believe what they choose, can strive for their own version of the good, can pursue their idea of happiness, and will not be excluded because of their beliefs. That's why the pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and made the long, dangerous journey to these shores, landing not so far from where we stand today.

That's why I found it so shocking when I heard Rick Warren had said, during the last presidential election, "I could not vote for an atheist because an atheist says…I'm totally self-sufficient by myself. And nobody is self-sufficient to be president by themselves. It's too big a job."

I want you to imagine that that Warren had been talking about your faith group. I could not vote for a Catholic. I could not vote for a Jew. I could not vote for a Muslim. A Hindu. A Sikh, a Buddhist or an Anglican. Can you imagine the uproar that such a statement would cause? I think that the principles which beckoned the pilgrims across the ocean, which enable Christians, Muslims, Jews, Hindus, Sikhs and Buddhists to practice their faith, should protect atheists and Humanists, too.

I think that wherever we find our spiritual calling whether it's the song of the muezzin or the lure of a star-dusted sky, we deserve to be heard. And that's why interfaith discussion is important, and why it must include people like me.

And interfaith discussion particularly matters now, at this moment. Because, let's face it, the dialogue around religion in this country is broken, and not just the dialogue between religious and nonreligious people.

Certainly, I think of the fact that there is, and only ever has been, one openly atheist member of Congress, and no openly atheist Senators. None.

But I also think of Pastor Terry Jones, who thought it would be a good idea to pile high copies of the Koran and set them alight, or protesters who rented decommissioned missiles and pointed them at a Muslim cultural center and mosque in New York City.

There are two potential responses to this. We could get angry, atheists tearing down religious political candidates, or Muslims burning copies of the bible, in an ever-escalating war of words and actions that brings us all down. We could all get our own missile.

Or we could get smart, and begin to engage with each other in a more respectful and productive way.

We are the perfect people to do this: in this room are the leaders of the future. Politicians, faith leaders, business leaders: people who will be in a position to influence discussions around faith in this country.

And now is the time to do this. Right here, right now, when we're all gathered together in one room—a remarkable and rare opportunity to engage with each other, to come to know each other more deeply.

So I'm asking you to dig deep, for all our sakes. Share your story, honestly and openly, and listen to the stories of people who disagree with you, profoundly. And we will disagree—I, for my own part, am skeptical about the future for faith at Harvard. And, as a gay man, I know there are people in this room who hold beliefs I find profoundly difficult. But, instead of sitting at home and complaining, or speaking just to those who agree with me, I came here. Because I know how important it is to be involved in the discussion. So don't hide your differences, don't be afraid to be vulnerable, to give of yourself, and be brave enough to listen. If we can do this I see a future in which, atheists, Christians, Buddhist, Jains can all sit around a table, breaking bread together. No more piles of the Koran, waiting to be set alight. No more missiles pointed at mosques. And, perhaps, and atheist Senator or two.

Comments (now closed)

Anon

31 Oct 2010 · 16:27 EST

Why must you be so pretentious and full of yourself? All humanists and religious fanatics are the same, you all need to get over preaching your beliefs and get on with your lives.

James Croft

31 Oct 2010 · 21:23 EST

We engage in discussions like these, and offer our writing, because we don't merely want to live our lives: we hope to live them well, with meaning, authenticity and moral worth. To do this you have to think about how you are going to live, and for what reasons. The articles we publish are all intended to explore these questions, and I think these questions are worth considering. The best response to religious fanaticism is not mindless disengagement from existential quandaries, but the restatement and interrogation of those dilemma from a constructive, naturalistic perspective.

RSA

31 Oct 2010 · 21:26 EST

Anon., to many, being able to honestly discuss issues of moral import is one of the most important parts about being a thinking human and "getting on with life." Whether this comes from a stance of faith or a place of reason (or a combination thereof) does not really matter, in the long run. What is important is that all can feel that they are not silenced -- and this article's author's call for us to "engage with each other in a more respectful and productive way" seems quite un-pretentious to me.

Kaleena

31 Oct 2010 · 22:17 EST

I'll say it again: this is beautiful. So don't hide your differences, don't be afraid to be vulnerable, to give of yourself, and be brave enough to listen. If we can do this I see a future in which, atheists, Christians, Buddhist, Jains can all sit around a table, breaking bread together. No more piles of the Koran, waiting to be set alight. No more missiles pointed at mosques. And, perhaps, and atheist Senator or two. (Also, I see that you cited an image, but I don't see the image...)

Kaleena

31 Oct 2010 · 22:18 EST

And whoops. I guess you can't add html nor edit comments. I had some and s in there...

Kaleena

31 Oct 2010 · 22:25 EST

And both the title and content reminded me of this: http://podcastdownload.npr.org/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/32/510072/16567152/CPR_16567152.mp3

HF

01 Nov 2010 · 11:10 EST

James, It seems to me that the conversation we had in our graduate dining hall about the meaning of life and atheist and Christian ethics was friendly, engaging, and honest. That conversation was precisely the kind of dialogue you are advocating for in this talk. We respectfully asked questions of one another and candidly put forward arguments in support of our positions, even though we strongly disagreed with one another at the time. I was a very young person when we last exchanged ideas on this topic, and my views have evolved significantly since then. If you're interested in speaking with me again, I hope that you will reach out to me through email so that we can revive our conversation once more. -Your fellow Harvard graduate student

James Croft

01 Nov 2010 · 23:55 EST

Hey HF! I want to clarify - I had many conversations around faith at the Graduate Center, most of which were precisely as you describe. If the description I gave here doesn't sound like the conversation we had, it's because I was describing another conversation with someone else! I didn't want to give names because I don't want to make this into a problem with the person I was discussing with, but it does give rise to the potential problem of mistaken identity...

view all comments >